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2013-05-22 "An Ongoing Project: Photos of Prints" 5

Nearly all of the pieces to be photographed are custom-framed, and thus are reasonably expensive and time-consuming to replace (and some are one-of-a-kind), so a combination of redundancy and over-provisioning was the name of the game. My spec for the system was to handle a 40-pound frame with near-zero chance of the frame ending up on the ground. The heaviest pieces I've done so far, two 24"x36" pieces with glass, should still fit within that envelope, and at this point I'm pretty confident that the system would be able to handle a minor earthquake without issue.

In the prototype, the two main pieces of wood are attached with two small bolts per plank, with a metal framing bracket actually connecting them. The final version will have a pair of brackets, tied together with three bolts, and holding the end of the horizontal plank flush against the back of the vertical plank.

The dowel is intended to locate the fixture both laterally and longitudinally in the head of the work stand. The stand's clamp closes on the dowel to prevent it from moving, and the dowel is again attached to the horizontal plank with bolts. The dowel is slightly wider than the planks themselves, which gives the setup plenty of strength to withstand any yaw forces.

Finally, the black thing near the left of the fixture is a self-tightening strap to lock the pitch of the fixture relative to the head of the workstand. The final version will need adjustable pitch (even if just using some shims and the same strap) to make it easier to square the face of the print to the orientation of the camera sensor.

Oh! I should note that I picked the Spin Doctor Pro G3 bike stand for its combination of portability, stability, robustness, and low cost. The large-diameter tubes are plenty rigid, and all of load-bearing components (including clamps) are constructed from metal.
NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D7100, f/2.8 @ 24 mm, 0.4s, ISO 100, No Flash

2013-05-22 "An Ongoing Project: Photos of Prints" 5

2013-05-22 "An Ongoing Project: Photos of Prints" 5

Nearly all of the pieces to be photographed are custom-framed, and thus are reasonably expensive and time-consuming to replace (and some are one-of-a-kind), so a combination of redundancy and over-provisioning was the name of the game. My spec for the system was to handle a 40-pound frame with near-zero chance of the frame ending up on the ground. The heaviest pieces I've done so far, two 24"x36" pieces with glass, should still fit within that envelope, and at this point I'm pretty confident that the system would be able to handle a minor earthquake without issue.

In the prototype, the two main pieces of wood are attached with two small bolts per plank, with a metal framing bracket actually connecting them. The final version will have a pair of brackets, tied together with three bolts, and holding the end of the horizontal plank flush against the back of the vertical plank.

The dowel is intended to locate the fixture both laterally and longitudinally in the head of the work stand. The stand's clamp closes on the dowel to prevent it from moving, and the dowel is again attached to the horizontal plank with bolts. The dowel is slightly wider than the planks themselves, which gives the setup plenty of strength to withstand any yaw forces.

Finally, the black thing near the left of the fixture is a self-tightening strap to lock the pitch of the fixture relative to the head of the workstand. The final version will need adjustable pitch (even if just using some shims and the same strap) to make it easier to square the face of the print to the orientation of the camera sensor.

Oh! I should note that I picked the Spin Doctor Pro G3 bike stand for its combination of portability, stability, robustness, and low cost. The large-diameter tubes are plenty rigid, and all of load-bearing components (including clamps) are constructed from metal.