Uploaded 27-Jan-14
Taken 17-Jan-14
Visitors 16


Trey Hardee

Every vaulter has their own start routine. Some people just grab the pole and take off, others (myself included) almost-ceremonially check their grip, pantomime a pole-plant, and then raise the pole, take a step back, and go. Consistency is a big part of the vault, and having a consistent start is the foundation for a consistent run.

Once the run begins, I'm on autopilot. I still have the tiniest amount of control, but by that point it's practically an illusion. This is one of the most frustrating things about the pole vault -- there's a chasm between knowing what you need to change and actually implementing that change, and turning the idea into action (especially during a meet) can be extraordinarily difficult. Most of the real thinking happens during practice.
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Trey Hardee

Trey Hardee

Every vaulter has their own start routine. Some people just grab the pole and take off, others (myself included) almost-ceremonially check their grip, pantomime a pole-plant, and then raise the pole, take a step back, and go. Consistency is a big part of the vault, and having a consistent start is the foundation for a consistent run.

Once the run begins, I'm on autopilot. I still have the tiniest amount of control, but by that point it's practically an illusion. This is one of the most frustrating things about the pole vault -- there's a chasm between knowing what you need to change and actually implementing that change, and turning the idea into action (especially during a meet) can be extraordinarily difficult. Most of the real thinking happens during practice.